Contact

Big Hassle Media NY
40 Exchange Pl, Ste. 1900
New York, NY 10005
P 212.619.1360

Big Hassle Media LA
3685 Motor Ave Suite 240.
Los Angeles, CA 90034
P 424.603.4655

Publicity

Coping Skills

Contact

Leigh Greaney
Big Hassle
Leigh@BigHassle.com

Biography

Coping Skills is a band of two people who live in Philadelphia, the place where bands are from now. Lauren DeLucca and Rachel Dispenza met by chance when they ended up moving into the same house after they both enrolled in college for the second time. They started working the same jobs, dreading the same bosses, and decided to learn how to play instruments so they could start a band. This is that band. They graduated, and as of this writing, their combined student loan debt is exactly $288,136.69. Which is a lot of money. They wrote a song about this. Please pay them.

Since starting the band in 2015, they’ve written a bunch of songs and played a bunch of shows and learned to play their instruments, more or less. That’s what bands do. In 2016, they released a tape called Relatable Web Content, which essentially describes the spirit of the thing. Rachel plays the guitar and sings. Lauren plays the bass and sings. They have a rotating cast of friends who play drums with them. For a while they used a drum machine operated by a stuffed hedgehog named Doug, but they fired Doug later that year. Despite creative differences, the three remain friends.

Their songs are just songs. You’ve heard songs? They sound like those. The best parts of this band come from a dynamic Rachel describes as an unstoppable-force-immovable-object-collision sorta situation, where theirs and Lauren’s gut impulses come in conflict, and they end up writing records full of pop songs about bagels and the way that life can suck. They self-identify as “moderately gay post-ironic bummer pop,” which gives you a good idea of what you’re in for.

On April 13th, they’re putting out a new record they’re calling Worst New Music, mostly because it fucking sucks, and they wanted to tell you that first. But also it’s because the idea of Music Taste is a late capitalist branding tool that only stands to benefit tech companies and major labels. Music criticism, as much as it even still exists in 2018, is a vehicle for ads for alcohol brands owned by InBev more often than it is anything else. (Also, hello, InBev if you’re reading this, Coping Skills would love to discuss the possibility of a more direct sponsorship opportunity.)

Anyway, behind that real firebrand of a title are more moving, endearing, and occasionally upsetting songs about, like, the exhausting burden of living under capitalism, post-millennial rot, and the ways mental health can affect both individuals and relationships. There’s still jokes and stuff, so it’s not that serious. But it kinda is.

Press Releases

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