Contact

Big Hassle Media NY
40 Exchange Pl, Ste. 1900
New York, NY 10005
P 212.619.1360

Big Hassle Media LA
3685 Motor Ave Suite 240.
Los Angeles, CA 90034
P 424.603.4655

Publicity

Ritt Momney

Contact

Jim Merlis
jim@bighassle.com

Biography

Ritt Momney, the Salt Lake City based lo-fi indie-pop brainchild of 19-year-old Jack Rutter, will release its debut album, Her and All of My Friends, on July 19. Highly influenced by Rutter’s Mormon upbringing and his estrangement from the church; Her and All of My Friends is a raw, emotional collection of beautiful melodies.

Rutter grew up hearing mostly his mother’s music – the Beatles, Simon & Garfunkel, and other classic popular artists – but he is more influenced by artists like STRFKR, Margot & The Nuclear So-and-So’s, and Earl Sweatshirt. Inspirations aside, he tries to avoid pulling too much from any one artist. “I try to be as transparent as possible in my music,” he says, “I’ve found that if I can just start making a song without any influence in mind, it usually ends up sounding more honest and original. Like it just came out of me, as opposed to being pieced together.”

Rutter spends most of his free time on his music, often re-working his songs for months on end. “There is always something to manipulate, always something I think could sound better.” This tinkering has paid off, and those who have enjoyed the early singles will find that the album expands some of Rutter’s best ideas.

Raised in a family of devout Mormons, Rutter himself appeared pretty devout as well until his senior year of high school. Two years earlier he had decided he was either agnostic or atheist, but was afraid of telling family and friends as he had heard Mormons talk about others who had “fallen away.” Halfway through his senior year, despite his skepticism, he was planning on serving a two year mission for the church. He felt the mission work would be easier than dealing with the social backlash that comes with staying home. The backlash itself, he says, “is not malicious” and manifests itself “mostly in forms of passive-aggression and condescension.” But telling his family was the more daunting prospect: they’d be spending a literal eternity in the celestial kingdom (highest form of heaven) without their son. “I was sure my entire community, including my family, would look at me the same way I’d looked at people who’d left the church when I was younger — ‘that’s so sad’ and ‘I pray for him every night’ and ‘we really need to get her back to church’ were phrases I’d heard and spoken often.”

When he got to college and made some non-Mormon friends (most of his high school friends had gone on missions upon graduating from high school), things started to open up. “I realized that I didn’t have to feel guilty for ‘falling away’ and I began noticing some of the very toxic aspects of the church’s culture — specifically its emphasis on the ‘one true church’ idea and how that perpetuates pride, judgement, and the trapped, guilty feeling that had largely defined my life since sophomore year of high school.” The song “(If) The Book Doesn’t Sell” deals with these thoughts head on.

He doesn’t think the church is evil, adding, “I’ve seen the Mormon church and religion generally bring lots of joy into peoples’ lives and I’m not here to tell them their beliefs are wrong. There was a time when I simply didn’t understand how people could believe in these seemingly ridiculous notions, and I thought that I must just be smarter than them for having realized ‘the truth’. I’ve since realized this ignorant and prideful judgement is exactly the type that caused my own depression and anxiety when I stopped believing. Now, I’m completely comfortable with the idea that I know no better than they do what’s out there.”
Her and All of My Friends, a collection of songs Rutter has been writing and producing since graduating high school in 2017, explores the emotional toil of growing up and moving on (or, rather, the inability to do so). “The summer after graduation, about 90% of my friends left on missions and my girlfriend went off to college. This sense of loss and loneliness, coupled with the religion stuff I was grappling with at the time, caused for a really, really hard year and a half or so. I was really depressed, but I was really thinking a lot. And I like to think of this album as a collection of those thoughts.”

Press Releases

Photos

Dimensions

4428x2784

Credit

James Kowalski

Dimensions

3130x2075

Credit

James Kowalski

Dimensions

2325x1819

Credit

James Kowalski

Dimensions

350x350